First Litchfield Artillery Regiment
~ BZ photos

Litchfield.bz (07-05-18)

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Litchfield.bz (07-05-17)

Cannon & Flag Salute to the 13 Original Colonies
Tuesday, July 4, 2017
Litchfield Green
The First Litchfield Artillery Regiment fired its cannons 13 times on the
Litchfield Green in honor of the original 13 colonies followed by the
ringing of church bells at 2 pm on July 4, 2017 in Litchfield, CT.
 
Litchfield First Selectman Leo Paul, Jr. (above right)
read the names of the 13 colonies in the order that
 they joined the United States and the flag was
presented for each state as the cannons were fired.

First Litchfield Artillery Regiment Introduction

First Litchfield Artillery Regiment Cannon Salute & SAR Flag Presentation

 

State flags were presented by the Gov. Oliver Wolcott, Sr.
Branch of the Sons of the American Revolution.

L-R: 1 Delaware (December 7, 1787) and 2 Pennsylvania (December 12, 1787)

L-R: 3 New Jersey (December 18, 1787) and 4 Georgia (January 2,1788)

L-R: 5 Connecticut (January 9, 1788) and 6 Massachusetts (February 6, 1788)

L-R: 7 Maryland (April 28, 1788) and 8 South Carolina (May 23, 1788)

L-R: 9 New Hampshire (June 21, 1788) and 10 Virginia (June 25, 1788)

L-R: 11 New York (July 26, 1788) and 12 North Carolina (November 21, 1789)

13 Rhode Island (May 29, 1790)

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Litchfield.bz (07-05-16)
The First Litchfield Artillery Regiment fires one of its cannons during an
Independence Day tribute in East Cemetery in Litchfield on Monday. BZ photos

Members of the First Litchfield Artillery Regiment in East Cemetery in Litchfield.

The cannons of the First Litchfield Artillery Regiment rang in Independence Day
 in Litchfield on Monday, first during a service at East Cemetery and later on the Green.

The service at the cemetery was held at the graves of Gov. Oliver Wolcott Sr.
and Col. Benjamin Tallmadge, two key figures during the Revolutionary War.
Wolcott signed the Declaration of Independence and was a brigadier general during
the war and Tallmadge directed an espionage unit for Gen. George Washington.

Gravesite of Oliver Wolcott, Sr. in East Cemetery in Litchfield

Gravesite of Benjamin Tallmadge in East Cemetery in Litchfield

The graveside service was organized by the Gov. Oliver Wolcott Sr. Branch
of the Sons of the American Revolution and the Mary Floyd Tallmadge
Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.



On the Green, the First Litchfield Artillery Regiment fired
its cannons 13 times in a tribute to the original 13 colonies.
The cannon fire was followed by a ringing of church bells at 2 p.m.,
the moment the Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, 1776.


The First Litchfield Artillery Regiment fires one of its 13 cannon volleys on the Green.

Reggie Harrison of the First Litchfield Artillery Regiment speaks to the crowd on the Green.

The flags of the original 13 colonies were displayed on the Green.

Members of the First Litchfield Artillery Regiment with one of its cannons.

Members of the Gov. Oliver Wolcott Sr. Branch of the Sons of the American Revolution

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First Litchfield Artillery Regiment Cannon Salute
Thursday, July 4, 2013
Litchfield Green

Litchfield.bz (07-05-13)



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Litchfield.bz (07-05-12)

1st Litchfield Artillery Regiment


The First Litchfield Artillery Regiment fires one of its cannons during the
Independence Day tribute to the original 13 colonies. BZ photo


The First Litchfield Artillery Regiment has been firing its cannons in a salute to the original 13 colonies since the 1960s.
 It was followed by the churches in the center of town ringing their bells 13 times at 2 p.m. to mark the time of
the signing of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776.

The idea to ring the bells was inspired by an article written in 1963 by author Eric Hatch
and artist Eric Sloane, both of Litchfield. "Let Freedom Really Ring"
appeared in This Week magazine and was so persuasive that it led Congress to
declare that church bells would be rung nationally every year at 2 p.m. on Independence Day.

Hatch, a veteran of World War I and II, founded the First Litchfield Artillery Regiment and spent
10 more years serving with it until he died, fittingly, at 2:15 p.m. on July, 4, 1973.

"The Artillery, which he founded and loved dearly, had just finished firing the 13-gun salute and the church bells
had rung in all of the Litchfield churches," Artillery member Reggie Harrison said in explaining the Independence Day
tradition before the cannons were fired. "The timing was perfect as one could ask for, and Eric held on
until his men had completed his ceremony."

At noon, the Artillery fired three shots during the tribute to Wolcott and Tallmadge at East Cemetery.
Leading the ceremony were the Mary Floyd Tallmadge Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution
and the Gov. Oliver Wolcott Sr. Branch of the Sons of the American Revolution.