Oliver Wolcott Library
160 South Street, PO Box 187
Litchfield, CT 06759
phone: 860-567-8030
fax: 860-567-4784

Regular Hours:
Monday ~ 12-5pm
Tues., Wed., Thurs. ~ 10am-9pm
Friday ~ 10am-5pm
Saturday ~ 10am-2pm
Sunday ~ 11am-3pm
Library Director ~ Ann Marie White: awhite@owlibrary.org
Librarian ~ Caitlin Costa: ccosta@owlibrary.org
Adult Services Librarian ~ Audra MacLaren: amaclaren@owlibrary.org
Publicity ~ Jordan McCorison: jmccorison@owlibrary.org

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Antique Button Roadshow
with Acorn Button Club of Central Connecticut
Thursday, August 23 ~ 6:30 - 8:00 pm
 Oliver Wolcott Library
Remember going through Grandma’s button box?
Remember playing “Button, button, who’s got the button?”
Join the Acorn Button Club of Central Connecticut as we revisit the art,
history, and beauty of antique buttons. We’ll take a trip together down
memory lane to discuss and view buttons as they were meant to be -
miniature works of art. If you have any old buttons, bring them along,
and we’ll help you learn about their age and history.

The Acorn Button Club was established in 1942. Members come
from various backgrounds and share a love of history. Acorn currently
 has 14 adult and 3 junior members ranging in age from 10 to 95 years old.
The roadshow program is designed for the novice button enthusiast.

About the presenters:
Arlene Creswell was given her grandmother’s button collection by her father.
Arlene never knew her grandmother but was able to connect with her
by playing with the buttons as a child. Arlene has been a
member of the Acorn Button Club for over 30 years and served
as the Acorn Club secretary for many years.

Laurel Durso was introduced to button collecting about 25 years ago.
A retired Fashion Technology teacher from W.F. Kaynor Technical High School,
Laurel now has a craft business, Laurel Accessories. At present she is
president of the Acorn Button Club as well as the Connecticut State
Button Society. She is one of three state directors
for the Northeast Regional Button Society.

Oliver Wolcott Library events are free and open to the public.
Space is limited. Registration is required.
or call 860-567-8030.

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Kindergarten Social
For children entering kindergarten
Friday, August 24 ~ 10:30 am
 Oliver Wolcott Library
All kindergartners and their parents are invited to a special story
hour for children getting ready to enter Kindergarten. Ease the anxiety
of the first day of school by hearing stories and songs about school
including Miss Bindergarten Gets Ready for Kindergarten by Ashley Wolff.
We’ll sing, listen to stories, enjoy finger plays, and practice following
directions and taking turns. Our special guest will be
 Litchfield Center School Librarian Mrs. Moore.
Join OWL’s  Mrs. Jackie Tiul and Center School’s
Librarian Mrs. Moore for this fun event!
Oliver Wolcott Library events are free and open to the public.
Space is limited. Registration is required.
or call 860-567-8030.

****************
Letters are Characters ©
A playful pre-reading program
for children ages 4-7
September 5 - November 7
Wednesdays 11:00 am
Oliver Wolcott Library
Parents/caregivers are children's first teachers and play a
critical role in literacy. During this fun and interactive program,
parents/caregivers will learn about how children learn to read as
well as how to provide effective, evidence-based support
and instruction and create enriching, lifelong reading habits.

Simultaneously, children will acquire pre-reading skills through story
and hands on, multi-sensory play that will enable them to begin to break
the phonemic code, an essential stepping stone in learning to read.  

The best predictor of reading readiness is symbol recognition
(knowing the names of upper and lower case letters) and sound symbol
 correspondence because it demonstrates that the neural pathways are
primed for reading acquisition (also known as breaking the phonemic code).
This program is designed to joyfully and playfully get all children
ready to read! Different learning styles will be discussed.

Caroline Wilcox Ugurlu is a researcher and teacher. She has spent
the last four years studying reading including the neurological processes
 involved in reading and the sociological, psychological and cultural
aspects of reading acquisition and its opposite - failure to acquire
reading fluency. She has developed a method to help children
ages 4 - 7 break the phonemic code in a fun and playful way.
She has authored a book on the subject (in the publication process).  
She is passionate about the importance of reading and wants to create
programs that work for all students including struggling readers/dyslexics.

Oliver Wolcott Library events are free and open to the public.
Space is limited. Registration is required.
Click here to register.
or call 860-567-8030.

****************
Ballad of  the Anarchist Bandits
with Author John Merriman
Thursday, September 6 ~ 7:00 - 8:00 pm
Oliver Wolcott Library
A fast-paced and gripping historical account, Ballad of the
 Anarchist Bandits is a true tale of idealists and lost causes --
and a vivid evocation of Paris in the dizzying years
 before the horrors of World War I were unleashed.

For six terrifying months in 1911-1912, the citizens of Paris were
gripped by a violent crime streak. A group of anarchists, motivated
 by the rampant inequality and poverty in Paris, went on a rampage
 throughout the city and its suburbs, robbing banks and wealthy
Parisians, killing anyone who got in their way, and always
 managing to stay one step ahead of the police.

John Merriman tells this story through the eyes of two young,
 idealistic lovers: Victor Kibaltchiche (later the famed Russian
revolutionary and writer Victor Serge) and Rirette Maîtrejean,
 who chronicled the Bonnot crime spree in the radical newspaper
L'Anarchie.  Victor and Rirette rejected the violence of Bonnot
 and his cronies, but to the police it made no difference.

John Merriman received his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan.
 He teaches French and Modern European history at YaleUniversity.
In 2018, Merriman received the American Historical Association
award for career "Distinguished Scholarship." He has authored and
 edited numerous books including The Agony of the Republic:
The Repression of the Left in Revolutionary France, 1848-1851 and
Dynamite Club: How a Café Bombing Ignited the Age of Modern Terror.
A wine & cheese reception will follow.
The Hickory Stick Bookshop
will provide books for sale & signing

Oliver Wolcott Library events are free and open to the public.
Space is limited. Registration is required.
or call 860-567-8030.

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Monday Scholars:
Plagues, Witches & War:
The Worlds of Historical Fiction
Mondays, September 10 - November 5
12:30 - 2:00 pm
Oliver Wolcott Library
*no meeting Oct. 8
Monday Scholars is a weekly series that combines the best of
online learning with classroom discussion. Each week a new lecture
topic is watched and discussed. All you need to do is come ready
to engage your mind and participate in the discussion.
Join Patricia Moore as she facilitates this course.

In this course, we will explore the genre and craft of historical fiction.
We'll learn about the history of the historical fiction novel through
the 18th and 19th centuries. This will include a review of major works
and authors from that period including The Leatherstocking Tales,
William Wells Brown, Charles Dickens, and Anne Katharine Green.
Author Geraldine Brooks, Mary Beth Keane, Yangsze Choo will be
featured interacting on video with the seminar class students
to discuss their books, Year of Wonders (Brooks) Fever (Keane)
and The Ghost Bride (Choo). We will also watch a series of interviews
with contemporary historical fiction authors including
Michael McKeon, David Robbins and Andrew Taylor.

On video, Bruce Holsinger will be the professor who leads the
online lectures. He teaches in the Department of English at the
University of Virginia in Charlottesville. He is the author of A Burnable Book,
a historical novel set in London in 1835. His work has been recognized
 with a Guggenheim Fellowship, and he is the recipient of research
 fellowships from the National Endowment for the
 Arts and the American Council of Learned Societies.
After watching a lecture together, we will then discuss what
we have learned! This series is perfect for aspiring writers, lovers of
historical fiction, and anyone who enjoys reading about the past.

Oliver Wolcott Library events are free and open to the public.
Space is limited. Registration is required.
or call 860-567-8030.

****************
Mystery of Sleep: Why a Good
Night's Rest is Vital to a Better Healthier Life
with Author & Physician Meir Kryger
Wednesday, September 12  ~ 7:00 - 8:00 pm
Oliver Wolcott Library
We spend a third of our lives in bed, but how much do we really
understand about how sleep affects us? In the past forty years,
scientists have discovered that our sleep (or lack of it) can affect
nearly every aspect of our waking lives. Poor sleep could be a
sign of a disease, the result of a vitamin or iron deficiency, or the
cause of numerous other problems. Yet many people,
even medical personnel, are unaware of the dangers of poor sleep.

Enter Dr. Meir Kryger, a world authority on the science of sleep,
with a comprehensive guide to the mysteries of slumber
 that combines detailed case studies and pragmatic advice.

Meir Kryger, MD, FRCPC, joined the Yale School of Medicine and the
VA Connecticut Health System, in November 2011. Previously
he was Professor of Medicine, University of Manitoba
where he established the first clinical laboratory studying
patients with sleep breathing problems in Canada.

Dr. Kryger was the first to diagnose and report obstructive sleep
apnea in North America. His laboratory elucidated the interaction
between heart failure and sleep respiration, publishing
the first systematic study of oxygen in this condition.

Dr. Kryger has published more than 200 research articles and book
chapters. He is the chief editor of the most widely used textbook
 in sleep medicine, The Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine,
and is the author of A Woman's Guide to Sleep Disorders, The Atlas of
Clinical Sleep Medicine, and Kryger's Sleep Medicine Review.
A wine & cheese reception will follow.
The Hickory Stick Bookshop will provide
books for sale & signing.

Oliver Wolcott Library events are free and open to the public.
Space is limited. Registration is required.
or call 860-567-8030.

****************
OWL's Non-Fiction Book Group
Thursday, September 13 ~ 2:00-3:15 pm
Oliver Wolcott Library
Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom
by Thomas E. Ricks
No one would have predicted that they would be considered two
of the most important people in British history for having the vision
and courage to campaign tirelessly against the totalitarian threat
from both the left and the right. In a crucial moment, they responded
first by seeking the facts of the matter, seeing through the lies and
obfuscations, and then they acted on their beliefs. Together they
kept the West's compass set toward freedom as its due north.
Moderated by Laurie

****************
OWL's Fiction Book Group
Thursday, September 13 ~ 3:30-5:00 pm
Oliver Wolcott Library
The Sense of an Ending
by Julian Barnes
A novel that can be read in a single setting, The Sense of an Ending
 follows Tony, a middle-aged man.  He contends with a past he never
 thought much about-until his closest childhood friends return with a
vengeance: one of them from the grave, another maddeningly present.
Tony thought he left this all behind as he built a life for himself.
But when he is presented with a mysterious legacy, he is forced
 to revise his estimation of his own nature and place in the world.  
Moderated by Jocelyn

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Oscar Wilde
Discussion with David Rosen
Sunday, September 16
Sunday, October 14
1:00 -2:00 pm
Oliver Wolcott Library
Join David Rosen as he explores Oscar Wilde's two classic works.

September 16: The Picture of Dorian Gray
In this work, Wilde forged a devastating portrait of the effects of evil
and debauchery on a young aesthete in late-19th-century England.
Combining elements of the Gothic horror novel and decadent French fiction,
 it centers on a striking premise: As Dorian Gray sinks into a life
 of crime and sensuality, his body retains perfect youth and vigor while
his recently painted portrait grow hideously more evil day by day.
October 14: The Importance of Being Earnest
Oscar Wilde's most brilliant tour de force - a witty and buoyant
comedy of manners that has delighted millions since its first performance
 in London's St. James' Theatre on February 14, 1895. The Importance
of Being Earnest is celebrated not only for the lighthearted ingenuity
of its plot, but for its inspired dialogue, rich with scintillating
epigrams still savored by all who enjoy artful conversation.

David Rosen is a Professor of English at Trinity College where he
teaches modern and contemporary British Literature and poetry.
He received his B.A. from Columbia, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Yale University.
 In 2006, he received the Arthur H. Hughes Award for Teaching Achievement.
 He is the author of two books: The Watchman in Pieces: Surveillance,
Literature, and Liberal Personhood; and Power, Plain English, and the
Rise of Modern Poetry. He has also authored numerous articles on
 literature. Books will be available 4 weeks prior to the discussion.

Oliver Wolcott Library events are free and open to the public.
Space is limited. Registration is required.
or call 860-567-8030.

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Meet Libby: Download E-Books & E-AudioBooks
with Librians Audra MacLaren & Patricia Moore
Tuesday, September 18 ~ 2:00 - 3:00 pm
Oliver Wolcott Library
Have you met Libby yet? Libby is the new, intuitive app to
download e-books and audiobooks from the library. No more clunky
 interfaces, or confusing web pages. Libby streamlines the process
of borrowing downloadable materials from the OWL. Join librarians
Audra MacLaren and Patricia Moore to learn all about the simplest
and most enjoyable way to browse, check out,
and read (or listen to!) e-books and e-audio.

BYOD--Bring your own device! Whether it's a smartphone,
iPad, or e-reader, bring it along to download and explore
Libby in real time with Audra and Patricia.

Oliver Wolcott Library events are free and open to the public.
Space is limited. Registration is required.
or call 860-567-8030.

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Lyme Disease:
The Many Paths to Feeling Better
with Dr. Alice Bell
Wednesday, September 19
7:00 - 8:00 pm
Oliver Wolcott Library
This presentation will cover Lyme disease - what it is, acute
and chronic symptoms of Lyme disease, testing, and what to
do if you get a tick bite. We will also explore Lyme controversies,
treatment options - both conventional and Naturopathic -
and alternative treatments for patients with Lyme disease.

Alice Bell, ND, MS, is a Connecticut-licensed Naturopathic Physician
practicing in Litchfield who performs extensive diagnostic testing
and treats patients using pharmaceutical grade supplements,
botanical medicine, and therapeutic nutrition. She specializes in
 treating adult patients with Lyme disease and the associated
co-infections, and other chronic diseases.

Bell has a doctorate in Naturopathic Medicine and an MS in Human Nutrition.
 She has been an Adjunct Professor at Sacred Heart University,
Westchester Community College, the University of Bridgeport,
 College of Mount Saint Vincent and Fairfield University where she taught
Anatomy & Physiology, Introduction to Nutrition, and other classes.

Oliver Wolcott Library events are free and open to the public.
Space is limited. Registration is required.
or call 860-567-8030.

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Letters Home & 13th Floor:
Three Plays written and performed
by Nancy Schuler
Tuesday, September 25 or
Wednesday, September 26
7:00 - 8:00 pm
Oliver Wolcott Library
Letters Home is actually two short pieces. The first half is a monologue.
Meet Margaret Griffin Carey born in 1883 (Nancy's Irish grandmother).
 Margaret tells of leaving Ireland and her days in the U.S. raising a family
and then sending her boys off to war. The second half is
Teresa Gargiulo Palmento (Nancy's Italian grandmother) born in Italy in 1888,
writing and receiving letters from her son, Gennaro, in the army during WWII.

The 13TH Floor is a much lighter, modern piece, full of dialogue
about two ships passing in the night. Nancy's husband, Ed, once again
will be joining her in two pieces. He will play the voice of
Gennaro in Letters Home and also Paul in The 13th Floor.

Nancy was born and raised in Waterbury and has lived in Litchfield
 for the past 20 years with her husband, Ed. After a life of teaching
art and painting, she transitioned to writing and acting. Her story
about Teresa, her Italian immigrant grandmother, was awarded a place
at the New York Public Library Equity Theater's 2017 new playwrights.
She performed Teresa at the Italian American Museum in New York,
the Manhattan Repertory Theatre, the New Britain Museum,
Shakesperience Productions, the Mattatuck Museum and many
 community centers and libraries. Her trilogy, Three Women,
Three Roads, has also been performed at numerous theatres and libraries.

Oliver Wolcott Library events are free and open to the public.
Space is limited. Registration is required.
September 25 - Click Here to Register
September 26 - Click Here to Register
or call 860-567-8030.

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Outrageous, Alarming, Courageous
& Charming: Randy Newman
A Presentation with Gil Gigliotti
Thursday, September 27 ~ 2:00 - 3:00 pm
Oliver Wolcott Library
If you only know "Short People" and "You've Got
a Friend in Me," then you don't know Randy Newman.

From his 1968 debut album through the 2017 Grammy-winning
Dark Matter (not to mention many of his very popular film soundtracks),
Randy Newman has populated his music with characters who
reflect the complexities and contradictions of
the late 20th and early 21st century United States.

Often misunderstood due to his forsaking the more confessional
 approach of pop/rock/folk singer-songwriters, Newman, steeped in
our national, musical and cinematic history, offers his listeners unflinching
portraits of outcasts, patriots, bigots, loners, lovers, and losers,
all struggling to understand our world, even as its
very foundation seems to be shifting beneath them.

Gilbert L. Gigliotti is a professor of English and Latin at
Central Connecticut State University and the host for more than
 two decades of "Frank, Gil, and Friends" every Tuesday morning on
WFCS 107.7 FM. He earned his PhD in comparative
literature at The Catholic University of America.

His books on Frank Sinatra, Eva Gardner and now Randy Newman
 (The Words & Music of Randy Newman will be out in December 2018)
belie his more traditional academic interests in American Puritans
 like Cotton Mather and the literature of ancient Greece and Rome.

Oliver Wolcott Library events are free and open to the public.
Space is limited. Registration is required.
or call 860-567-8030.

****************
Jennifer Sabella “Order & Chaos” Mixed Media
 Jamie Gagarin Community Room and Gallery
Oliver Wolcott Library
On Exhibit: July 5 through August 27
Jennifer paints with vibrant hues in multiple layers, capturing her
exuberance and fascination with color and texture. She has developed
her own style through many years of experimentation, adventurously
exploring a wide range of materials: wood, wire, canvas and
aluminum, which lent to the influence of surface
material in her Gravity Wave series of paintings. 
 
In this entirely new body of work, Jennifer tackles “Order & Chaos.”
A dichotomy present throughout her work, she defines animated brush
strokes into geometric hand-cut wooden pieces, and funnels free-flowing
streams of paint into orderly lines atop canvases. This juxtaposition
 is not only highlighted in the varying techniques that she employs in
an individual piece, but also comparatively from one work to another.
Her work highlights both the organization and disorganization of the color
palette, presenting a more literal interpretation of “Order” and “Chaos.”

 
Many of these works reside at the new home of BluePrint CT in Bantam.
The artist’s work is also featured in private collections around the world,
including the boutique hotel Fort Point Marriott Residence Inn, Boston. 
 
In addition to producing work for her collection, Jennifer has also recently
started HUE Studio: an open studio concept intended to allow for
greater inclusivity and to promote experimentation in the world of
abstract art. Lessons are given in her bright home studio, where she
teaches the very palette knife and drip painting techniques she uses
 in her own work. The beauty of HUE Studio is that no two works are
 exactly the same. The end result is completely determined
 by the artist’s imagination and color choices. 

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Children’s Programs

Children’s Storytimes
Drop in storytimes,
no registration required!

Early Bird Café
Sept. 4 - Nov. 8 ~ 10:30 am
Oliver Wolcott Library
Join us for the Early Bird Café which will be open before every
Bouncing Baby and Preschool Storytime session! Drop in and meet
us before the session starts to socialize! Socialize with new
friends and neighbors and have a chance to talk to Mrs. Shaia.
 Light refreshments will be served.

****************
Bouncing Babies
(For babies birth - 24 months)
Tuesdays,  Sept. 4 - Nov. 6 ~ 11:00 am
Oliver Wolcott Library
Enjoy concept and rhyming books, learn finger plays, and meet other
families in this interactive program with Mrs. Shaia. Your child will
form a bond with you, develop listening skills and begin vocabulary
 development. Playtime will follow to foster your children’s
imagination, development and social skills.

****************
Preschool Storytime
(For Ages 2-5)
Thursdays, Sept. 6 - Nov. 8 ~ 11:00 am
Oliver Wolcott Library
Experience new and classic picture books, learn movement activities,
and build pre-literacy skills such as phonological awareness
and comprehension. Mrs. Shaia will read stories that encourage
participation and comment. Playtime at one of our new play centers
will follow to stimulate your child’s imagination and creativity!

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Brain Games with BrainHQ
Introducing BrainHQ: a new online service available to all OWL library
card holders. This new online resource builds your attention, memory,
brain speed, people skills, navigation, and intelligence in dozens of
exercises with hundreds of brain training levels. Each one automatically
 adapts to your unique brain, so that you're always training at your
 "threshold" - the right level for your brain to make real improvements.
BrainHQ can be accessed online at the library, at home,
or on your smartphone with your OWL library card number.
Click here or on the front page of our website owlibrary.org
 or ask us to help you get started using BrainHQ.
We feel smarter already!

****************
Oliver Wolcott Library Book Groups
Book discussions are free and open to the public.
Join us for stimulating conversation and new friendships.
Copies of the books selected are available the month prior
to discussions at the Oliver Wolcott Library circulation desk.

OWL’s Non-Fiction Book Group
Thursday, September 13 ~ 2:00-3:15 pm
Oliver Wolcott Library
Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom
by Thomas E. Ricks
No one would have predicted that they would be considered two of the
most important people in British history for having the vision and courage
to campaign tirelessly against the totalitarian threat from both the left
 and the right. In a crucial moment, they responded first by
seeking the facts of the matter, seeing through the lies and obfuscations,
and then they acted on their beliefs. Together they kept the
West's compass set toward freedom as its due north.
Moderated by Laurie

New members welcome!
Come to one or all meetings.
Books are available at the front desk.
Second Thursday of each month from 2:00-3:00 p.m.
Where: The Jamie Gagarin Community Room & Gallery
Facilitated by: Caitlin Costa ccosta@owlibrary.org

Oliver Wolcott Library Book Groups
Book discussions are free and open to the public.
Join us for stimulating conversation and new friendships.
Copies of the books selected are available the month prior
to discussions at the Oliver Wolcott Library circulation desk.

****************
OWL’s Fiction Book Group
Thursday, September 13 ~ 3:30-5:00 pm
Oliver Wolcott Library
The Sense of an Ending
by Julian Barnes
A novel that can be read in a single setting, The Sense of an Ending
 follows Tony, a middle-aged man.  He contends with a past he never
thought much about—until his closest childhood friends return with a
vengeance: one of them from the grave, another maddeningly present.
Tony thought he left this all behind as he built a life for himself.
But when he is presented with a mysterious legacy, he is forced to
revise his estimation of his own nature and place in the world.  
Moderated by Jocelyn

New members welcome!
Come to one or all meetings.
Books are available at the front desk.
Second Thursday of each month from 3:30-5:00 p.m.
Where: The Jamie Gagarin Community Room & Gallery
Facilitated by: Caitlin Costa ccosta@owlibrary.org

Oliver Wolcott Library Book Groups
Book discussions are free and open to the public.
Join us for stimulating conversation and new friendships.
Copies of the books selected are available the month prior
to discussions at the Oliver Wolcott Library circulation desk.

****************
Books for Bedtime
Wednesday nights at 7:00 p.m.
on Cable 5 TV
Watch Mrs. Shaia & Mrs. Moore, (Center School Librarian) read stories to
get you snuggled in for the night! Airs Wednesday nights at 7:00 on Cable 5 TV.
Come to the Library to check out books featured on the show!

****************
Preschool Storytimes
2-5 year olds
 
Experience new and classic picture books and flannelboard stories,
learn movement activities, and build pre-literacy skills such as
phonological awareness and comprehension in this educational program.

 
Stories will be read that encourage participation and comment,
and recall your child’s focus through talking about the books.

 

 

 

 

****************
Exotic Animals
With Animal Show on the Go
Saturday, July 28, 2018
Animal Show on the Go is an exotic pet rescue
 that houses snakes, lizards, turtles, birds, frogs, chinchillas, rabbits,
ducks, hedgehog and arthropods. It is run by Cindy King who has
worked with over 100 species of animals including
venomous snakes, raptors, and lesser cats. ~ BZ photos

 


****************
Stuffed Animal Clinic
Saturday, January 13, 2018
@ Oliver Wolcott Library
Children ages 3-8 visited the Oliver Wolcott Library on Saturday
with their stuffed animals. OWL Children's Librarian Lisa Shaia read
the book A Sick Day for Amos McGee by Philip Stead. ~ BZ photos

OWL Llibrarian Caitlin Costa helped the children
to check out the stuffed animals for flu symptoms.



Then the children created a first aid kit with a stethoscope, a band aid
and a  prescription notebook to take home and use all winter long.







****************
New Beech Comes Home
to Oliver Wolcott Library
Thanks to a generous anonymous donor, the Oliver Wolcott Library planted a new
copper beech tree to replace the majestic 125-year old copper beech that died of natural
causes last year. The previous large tree, which was a major architectural structure on
the OWL property, was 127 years old, and would have been planted during the time when
the Great Blizzard of 1888 hit Litchfield. Due to the significance of the tree, the Library
appointed a special committee to explore the best way to honor the special tree, and
decide on its future replacement. The Beech Tree Committee was comprised of both library
trustees and community members and included: Susan Spencer (Chair), Stuart Chapman,
Jim Huffstetler, Drew Harlow, Jane Hinkel, John LaGattuta, Marla Patterson, and Ann Marie White
 (Library Director).  In deciding its replacement, the Beech Tree Committee explored
many options but ultimately decided that another copper beech would be the best choice.
Appropriately for OWL, beech trees have a past that is associated with books and writing.  
Historical garden sources, including oxforddictionaries.com and gardenguide.com claim
that writing on beech wood originated with Iron Age Germanic tribes, who reportedly would
often inscribe magical runes upon beech wood tablets. This practice transitioned into broader
writing upon beech wood tablets and from this, the first books can be traced.  A long-standing
and still widely accepted etymology assumes that the Germanic base of book is related
ultimately to the name of the beech tree.

To preserve the legacy of the more than century old tree, three local artists were contacted
to prepare special items for the library made from the tree: John LaGattuta, Richard Heys and Jim Nash.  
Artist Richard Heys created unique and specially-crafted bowls that were auctioned at this
past year's Festival of Trees, the Oliver Wolcott Library's annual fund-raising event held every November.
The new copper beech was planted this week by Arbor Services of Washington who had
worked closely with the library and the donor in selecting the individual specimen.
"Bill and Joslyn Pollock who own Arbor Services were extraordinarily picky about finding
just the right tree for us. They recognized our need for a signature tree to honor our old beech
and to celebrate the future." said Ann Marie White, Library Director.

Copper beech trees often reach heights of 70 to 80 feet, and live for 150 to 250 years.  
Small quantities of seeds may be produced around 10 years of age, but a heavy,
steady crop won't be produced until the tree reaches about 30 years of age.

"We are truly delighted to have another copper beech blessing the lawn of the Library
to welcome visitors and celebrate the beauty and inspiration of nature. We encourage
everyone to stop by the Library and say hello to our new tree!" said White.

****************
Landmark copper beech outside library is taken down
Litchfield.bz (05-29-14)
 
BZ photos

****************
The Oliver Wolcott Library
Plans a Farewell to its Majestic Friend
"Our beautiful copper beech tree has been a symbol of the library for decades.
We are sad to see it go" said Library Director Ann Marie White.
The Beech Tree is slated to be removed in late May or early June.
Since the Oliver Wolcott Library moved to its current location in July of 1967, the beautiful
Copper Beech Tree by the main entrance has welcomed visitors. With its wide branches,
stunning copper leaves, and enormous trunk, it has delighted and enchanted library patrons
for decades. Because of its probable age, the tree has likely been witness to many of
Litchfield's important historical moments. The Library will be holding a contest for children
to guess the age of the tree, so for this story, we don't want to reveal the possible age.
What we do know is that it is very old and very large.

"Dead trees have many uses and can be stunning in their own right. However, being a public
building with about 250 visitors a day, we cannot accept the threat that a dead tree could
pose to our patrons. As a result, after much careful deliberation and thought, the Library's
Beech Tree Committee concluded that the tree should be removed" said White.

The tree had been declining for more than ten years. The Library did everything it could to keep
 it strong including using a skilled arborist to assist with best practice for the care and nurturing
of big trees. But, ultimately, like all things in life, the tree finally reached the end of its life.
"Once it really started to go, it went quickly" observed Library Board President John Boyd.  
By the summer of 2013, the tree did not have one leaf and was proclaimed totally dead.

The Library formed a Beech Tree Committee appointed by the Board President. "I wanted to
make the committee inclusive so that we had a number of voices as well as expertise.
We know how much the tree means to us and to the whole community. " said Boyd.

The Committee includes local artisan and owner of Northwest Corner Woodworks John LaGattuta;
Litchfield Garden Club past President and Litchfield Land Trust board member Drew Harlow;
Litchfield Garden Club member Jane Hinkel; Litchfield Garden Club member Marla Patterson;
Vice President of Chapman Lumber and library trustee Stuart Chapman; Founder of Zero Odor
and library trustee Jim Huffstetler; White Memorial trustee and library trustee
Susan Spencer; and Library Director Ann Marie White.

After careful review and deliberation, the Committee decided that they would work with three local
artisans who will craft specially-made items from the beech tree that the library can own and
proudly display as a way to honor and memorialize the tree. Local artisans Richard Heys and
John LaGattuta plan to craft a bowl or other small treasure, and local miller John Nash of Hartland
is planning to craft a table. This is all dependent on the tree being sound upon removal
and after about a year or so of the wood curing.

Additional plans include saving a couple of slabs of the tree, if sound,
to use as an educational tool that will highlight significant historical
events matched to the tree rings of that same year.

The Committee also plans to replant. "We want to see the renewal of life and we plan on
planting another tree near where our magnificent beech tree stood" said White.
The Committee is still reviewing options and ideas for what type of tree but intends to
make it a native one.  Planting of the new tree is set for either the fall of 2014 or spring of 2015,
depending on the tree selected and availability.

As Henry David Thoreau remarked, "I frequently tramped eight or ten miles through the deepest
snow to keep an appointment with a beech tree, or yellow birch, or an old acquaintance among
the pines". While the Oliver Wolcott Library is saddened to see its friend, the magnificent
Copper Beech go, we look forward to memorializing it with local artisans, using the opportunity
to educate young on how to know trees, and planting a new tree that will
encourage people to come to the library to welcome the new tree.